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PASSOVER 2021

 

Last year, Passover was the first holiday we shared together in online format.  A year later, we have all become experts at creating meaningful, online and distanced gatherings for our families, friends, and community.  See what Barnert has in store for you this Passover holiday.


PASSOVER HAPPENINGS AT BARNERT

Join us as we make some delicious Passover treats - Passover Mandelbrot and Matzah Granola - with our Barnert chefs Ilene Kandler and Rita Kron.  You will want to eat these goodies all year long!  Open to Barnert members and their guests.

Details & Registration >>

Barnert members will Receive a gift of gourmet Passover items and a custom-designed ritual item for your seder table.  We encourage you to also bring items for any one of our Social Action collections.  Be generous as receiving feels even better when combined with giving.

Details & Registration >>

Passover was our first significant online gathering last year.  Since then, we have all become experts at creating meaningful online experiences for our families, friends, and Barnert community.  Join us for our Second Night Seder as we celebrate our traditions together in new and meaningful ways.

Details >>

Shabbat Party and Passover Story
(Preschoolers and Their Families)
Friday, March 26
10:30-11:30 a.m. (note earlier time for Shabbat)

Passover Story and Song with Saralosch, Rabbi Steiner, and Friends
(K-3rd Graders and Their Families)
Sunday, March 28
10:00 - 10:45 a.m.

Passover TAG Experiences
(3rd-6th Graders in JJP)
Throughout Passover
Contact Jennifer Katz-Goldstein for details on the exciting activities you can do at home.

Details & Links (Login Required) >>


THE SEDER PLATE: A CENTRAL SYMBOL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last year at Passover, we were just entering the realities of the COVID pandemic in the United States.  Most were not able to gather in person or even obtain the tradItional items for their Passover seder plate or meal.

A year later, COVID is still with us.  However, most of us have the ability to obtain groceries and special items for holidays.  Because of the vaccine, some may even feel comfortable gathering with immediate family.  Even with the ability to resume some familiar traditions and practices, this past year has shown how creativity and the willingness to introduce creative practices can breath new life into our faith and rituals. 

Don't be scared to get creative once again.  Many of you shared how much you enjoyed incorporating new items to represent the symbols on a traditional seder plate.  Judaism survives and thrives by remembering the intent and adapting to meet our needs.  Let the meaning, symbols and your creativity inspire you!  

NEW SEDER PLATE SYMBOLS

During Passover, a celebration of freedom, many of us add other symbolic items to remind us of the numerous people who are not fully free.  These items are reminders for each of us to actively work to bring about the liberation of all people.  Consider adding and discussing some of the symbols below to your seder plate this year.

Orange: Representing members of the LGBTQ community and other marginalized groups.

Potato: Representing the exodus of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.

Banana: Representing the struggle of refugee children around the world.

Tomato: Representing the people who care for and harvest our food, often underpaid and overworked.  

LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE AND OTHER SYMBOLS >> 

8 MODERN SYMBOLS FOR YOUR SEDER PLATE >> 


ADDITIONAL PASSOVER RESOURCES

Mon, June 21 2021 11 Tammuz 5781